Interview: Emmy the Great

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Emmy the Great, otherwise known as Emma Lee Moss is London based singer songwriter and is an emerging talent from the popular anti-folk scene.
She released her debut album ‘First Love’ this year to much critical acclaim and since then has secured slots at Glastonbury, Summer Sundae Weekender and The Big Chill.
FQ: Do you prefer festivals or gigs?
EG: I love playing festivals so much because of the spirit you know, it’s like you show up, you use what you can and you know you just have to do the best with what you have. Also everyone usually enjoys it because that’s what they are there for, to watch lots and lots of music. But, at the same time I also love touring because you get to really think about every set and you can make it perfect, so they are both good.
FQ: Do you have a favourite track you love to perform live?
EG: No it’s different at different times, but I like playing any song that we didn’t play last time, so there always has to be at least one change of set. We are doing the upbeat songs for festivals and we have a small pool of those, so I like to drop one out and then bring it back.
FQ: You have just released the new E.P of some of your early tracks, is that what you are really into at the moment and like to play live?
EG: Not really we have a song called ‘Lost in Austin’ that will never make it onto a record, it’s a lot of fun to play it’s kind of like a rock and roll song, so maybe that is the song we like best.
FQ: If you could pick one song by another arist that you could have written yourself, what would it be and why?
EG: umm...different stuff at different times, if I like a song by another person I will try and mimic in my own way.
EG: So your tastes are constantly changing?
FQ: Yeah, pretty much.
FQ: What kinds of things influence your song-writing?
EG: Things like the countryside, travelling, walking, basically anytime when I am not specifically thinking about song writing. I will sit at a computer sometimes to write a song and not come up with anything and I think I will go and live my life, and that night I will always have something that I want to write about.
FQ: What kind of music did you grow up listening to?
EG: The moment I could choose my own music it what grunge, it was probably around the time that Curt Cobain died and I was just getting into Nirvana, and then I got quite into college rock, Wheezer, Cake, a whole load of Ironic slacker bands from the 90’s.
EQ: Any artists you really like at the moment?
EG: I really like Wild Beasts at the moment, I’ve been listening to them over and over, and I’ve also been listening to a lot of Tom Waits stuff that I didn’t know existed, a lot of albums with concepts I am listening to at the moment, especially the ones that are hysterical and a little bit theatrical.
FQ: So if you could pick one moment of your career out what would it be?
EG: It’s always stuff to do with the BBC, I always feel like you’ve done well if you happen to be in a BBC building. I grew up listening to Radio 4 so it’s like you’re a British band...go to the BBC.
Emmy the Great, otherwise known as Emma Lee Moss is London based singer songwriter and is an emerging talent from the popular anti-folk scene.
She released her debut album ‘First Love’ this year to much critical acclaim and since then has secured slots at Glastonbury, Summer Sundae Weekender and The Big Chill.
FQ: Do you prefer festivals or gigs?

EG: I love playing festivals so much because of the spirit you know, it’s like you show up, you use what you can and you know you just have to do the best with what you have. Also everyone usually enjoys it because that’s what they are there for, to watch lots and lots of music. But, at the same time I also love touring because you get to really think about every set and you can make it perfect, so they are both good.
FQ: Do you have a favourite track you love to perform live?

EG: No it’s different at different times, but I like playing any song that we didn’t play last time, so there always has to be at least one change of set. We are doing the upbeat songs for festivals and we have a small pool of those, so I like to drop one out and then bring it back.
FQ: You have just released the new E.P of some of your early tracks, is that what you are really into at the moment and like to play live?

EG: Not really we have a song called ‘Lost in Austin’ that will never make it onto a record, it’s a lot of fun to play it’s kind of like a rock and roll song, so maybe that is the song we like best.
FQ: If you could pick one song by another arist that you could have written yourself, what would it be and why?

EG: umm...different stuff at different times, if I like a song by another person I will try and mimic in my own way.
EG: So your tastes are constantly changing?

FQ: Yeah, pretty much.
FQ: What kinds of things influence your song-writing?

EG: Things like the countryside, travelling, walking, basically anytime when I am not specifically thinking about song writing. I will sit at a computer sometimes to write a song and not come up with anything and I think I will go and live my life, and that night I will always have something that I want to write about.
FQ: What kind of music did you grow up listening to?

EG: The moment I could choose my own music it what grunge, it was probably around the time that Curt Cobain died and I was just getting into Nirvana, and then I got quite into college rock, Wheezer, Cake, a whole load of Ironic slacker bands from the 90’s.
FQ: Any artists you really like at the moment?

EG: I really like Wild Beasts at the moment, I’ve been listening to them over and over, and I’ve also been listening to a lot of Tom Waits stuff that I didn’t know existed, a lot of albums with concepts I am listening to at the moment, especially the ones that are hysterical and a little bit theatrical.
FQ: So if you could pick one moment of your career out what would it be?

EG: It’s always stuff to do with the BBC, I always feel like you’ve done well if you happen to be in a BBC building. I grew up listening to Radio 4 so it’s like you’re a British band...go to the BBC.
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