Reviews

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Written by Sam Borrett (Editor) Saturday, 26 June 2010 14:04
Features - Reviews
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On a blistering hot Saturday afternoon at Glastonbury a return to the John Peel stage was long overdue having not made a visit last year.  Leaving the sauna that they are calling the press tent, I made it over there in time to see Cymbals Eat Guitars who I'd been looking to check out for a little while.

Their set didn't disappoint, high energy and solid tracks which deserved more than the half full John Peel tent with the majority of listeners sat on the floor. I can only assume it's simply too hot for full on revelling and the sun has drawn people out of the tent stages and into the fields.  (If you like your indie rock then this four piece from New York is well worth having a listen - they're playing at End of the Road Festival on 10 September).

Speaking of fields, the next band up - Field Music - should have been right at home at Glastonbury, essentially a big field of music.  Having been hotly tipped this year the four piece from Sunderland were let down by the sound crew for their first track with the on-stage monitors not working.  They muddled through the first track before a lengthy delay to fix the levels in the monitors. An awkward situation for any band and the next few songs were a definate improvement from the first but the set never really lived up to the hype.  The band lack a proper front man, the keyboard player sang lead vocals for the first two tracks before swapping with the drummer who took up the rhythm guitar and lead vocal duty.  A nice touch and made things more watchable. 

If I had to choose between these two promising bands I'd go with Cymbals Eat Guitars but you'll have to make your own mind up. That's the joy of Free Will. 

Written by Martin Guttridge-Hewitt Thursday, 18 February 2010 14:24
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A Guy Called Gerald @ The Deaf Institute On January 29th the Red Bull Music Academy touched down in Cottonopolis for a weekend of debauchery courtesy of some of electronic music's old school heroes and latter day legends. Naturally, we were on hand to take a closer look. It's Friday night and we've just opened the doors back into a bakin…
Written by Kevin Angel Monday, 19 October 2009 23:47
Features - Reviews
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For those of you who aren’t aware of Shane Meadows or don’t think you know him, he is simply one of England’s best modern film-makers. He has in the past directed many classic pieces of modern cinema including ‘Dead Mans Shoes’ and ‘This is England’ to name but a few. His most recent piece of film-making ‘Le Donk and Scor-Zay-Zee sees him take a more experimental and less conventional route to producing a feature film than he has previously used, however he still produces a satisfying and well produced piece of modern British cinema.
Filmed over 5 days and with a budget of approx £30k, Le-Don and Scor-Zay-Zee is an improvised comedy conceived by and starring Paddy Considine and Nottingham based rapper, Scor-Zay-Zee.
Considine (who has previously starred in other Meadow’s films including Dead Man’s Shoes) plays Le-Donk, a charming but helpless roadie and aspiring band-manager, he takes Scor-Zay-Zee under his wing and takes him on a life changing journey that ultimately sees Scor-Zay-Zee play to the biggest audience of his life, thanks to a certain band called The Arctic Monkeys. Although the film is improvised all the cast give confident and convincing performances of each of their respective characters and considering the films short 70 minute running time the plot feels sufficiently developed enough to leave you satisfied. The film is laden with laugh out loud moments as the hopeless pair try and conquer the UK music scene whilst Le Donk deals with his screwed up personal life, and although maybe not one for the whole family will come as a welcome treat to British Comedy fans.
For those of you who aren’t aware of Shane Meadows or don’t think you know him, he is simply one of England’s best modern film-makers. He has in the past directed many classic pieces of modern cinema including ‘Dead Mans Shoes’ and ‘This is England’ to name but a few. His most recent piece of film-making ‘Le Donk and Scor-Zay-Zee sees him take a more experimental and less conventional route to producing a feature film than he has previously used, however he still produces a satisfying and well produced piece of modern British cinema.
Filmed over 5 days and with a budget of approx £30k, Le-Don and Scor-Zay-Zee is an improvised comedy conceived by and starring Paddy Considine and Nottingham based rapper, Scor-Zay-Zee.
Considine (who has previously starred in other Meadow’s films including Dead Man’s Shoes) plays Le-Donk, a charming but helpless roadie and aspiring band-manager, he takes Scor-Zay-Zee under his wing and takes him on a life changing journey that ultimately sees Scor-Zay-Zee play to the biggest audience of his life, thanks to a certain band called The Arctic Monkeys. Although the film is improvised all the cast give confident and convincing performances of each of their respective characters and considering the films short 70 minute running time the plot feels sufficiently developed enough to leave you satisfied. The film is laden with laugh out loud moments as the hopeless pair try and conquer the UK music scene whilst Le Donk deals with his screwed up personal life, and although maybe not one for the whole family will come as a welcome treat to British Comedy fans.
Written by Kevin Angel Monday, 05 October 2009 15:22
Features - Reviews
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There must be something in the water in Scotland; the sheer amount of talent coming out of the Country at the moment is quite frankly alarming, putting many English bands to complete shame. The band will no doubt be compared to the likes of Biffy Clyro simply for the long dishevelled hair and the fact they are Scottish (Glaswegian to be pricse), however this couldn’t be further from the truth. While the band may deliver a similar style of indie-rock with catchy memorable choruses and strong guitar hooks, it’s the extra little mile the band goes to do something different that really brings them into a league of their own. Just when you think you have seen it all and have sussed Twin Atlantic a guitar is taken off to be replaced by a Cello adding an extra layer of depth and beauty to their sound. The band gave charismatic performances and songs such as ‘You’re turning into John Wayne’ and ‘Lightspeed’ were well received by the small yet supportive audience and Twin Atlantic gave the audience exactly what they came for, a bit of a sing-a-long and a whole lot of energy.
The band gave a worthy headlining performance and with time they will continue to grow into what they deserve to be, a widely known band that isn’t afraid to do things a little different. Let’s hope they don’t bottle it and stop the use of the cello just to appease the indie-rock fans.
There must be something in the water in Scotland; the sheer amount of talent coming out of the Country at the moment is quite frankly alarming, putting many English bands to complete shame. The band will no doubt be compared to the likes of Biffy Clyro simply for the long dishevelled hair and the fact they are Scottish (Glaswegian to be pricse), however this couldn’t be further from the truth. While the band may deliver a similar style of indie-rock with catchy memorable choruses and strong guitar hooks, it’s the extra little mile the band goes to do something different that really brings them into a league of their own. Just when you think you have seen it all and have sussed Twin Atlantic a guitar is taken off to be replaced by a Cello adding an extra layer of depth and beauty to their sound. The band gave charismatic performances and songs such as ‘You’re turning into John Wayne’ and ‘Lightspeed’ were well received by the small yet supportive audience and Twin Atlantic gave the audience exactly what they came for, a bit of a sing-a-long and a whole lot of energy.
The band gave a worthy headlining performance and with time they will continue to grow into what they deserve to be, a widely known band that isn’t afraid to do things a little different. Let’s hope they don’t bottle it and stop the use of the cello just to appease the indie-rock fans that can't handle a bit of culture.

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